Start Dating and marriage in colonial times

Dating and marriage in colonial times

Although the settlers and their descendants, known as Americo-Liberians, defined the boundaries of the nation-state, made English the official language, and dominated the government and economy for almost one hundred fifty years, they have never constituted as much as 5 percent of the population.

The flag is a replica of the American flag, but with a single large white star on a blue field representing Liberia's long history as the "Lone Star," the only independent republic in Africa during the colonial period.

The Great Seal depicts a sailing ship like that which carried the American settlers to Africa, a palm tree, and a plow and ax with the motto "The Love of Liberty Brought Us Here." Emergence as a Nation.

All these groups were present in the territory when the American settlers arrived in 1822.

The capital, Monrovia, was named for the United States president James Monroe and is situated near the original landing site of the American settlers.

Another recognizable social group, the so-called civilized natives, consisted of those who had been educated and Christianized in mission schools while maintaining their indigenous identity.

This group was often a vocal source of criticism of the settler elite. Liberia's sixteen ethnolinguistic groups, although characterized as tribes, have never constituted unified, historically continuous political entities.

All the other groups number less than 10 percent of the total. The official language is English, which is used for instruction in all public and mission schools and in university education.