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Nsa internet dating

If it seems like someone might be good in bed, women are more likely to say “yes” to a hook-up.

One of the oldest canards – something I’ve written about before, in fact – is the idea that women don’t like sex, especially casual sex, as much as men do.

It’s the subject of many a heated debate, the punchline to hacky comedians’ jokes and the background noise in movies and sitcoms since pretty much forever.

To give an example, let’s look at the Pick-Up community.

Many – if not most – schools of pick-up teach an intimidatingly aggressive approach to getting sex, one that’s almost specifically designed to turn women off.

So let’s talk a little about what happens in a social situation.

The most significant find in Baranowski and Hecht’s study is how much their findings correspond with Terri Conley’s pleasure principle: women were less likely to be receptive to offers of casual sex because most of the time the sex wasn’t seen as being enjoyable enough to overcome the potential risks.

To test this idea, Baranowski and Hecht concocted a new study.

In this version, the subjects – men and women both – were invited into the lab under the pretense that they would be taking part in a study to help a popular dating site adjust and calibrate its compatibility matrix.

Baranowski and Hecht zeroed in on a commonly overlooked fact in these studies: women face greater personal and social risks when it comes to sex.

Unsurprisingly, the potential for physical danger, pregnancy and good old-fashioned slut-shaming bullshit are all unlikely to induce the screaming thigh-sweats in even the terminally horny.

The ur-evidence of this belief is the infamous Clark-Hatfield study, which was published in 1989 and replicated over and over again by You Tube pranksters as “social experiments” ever since.